All posts by Aidan Fatkin

The Woman In The Window: “A great Noir that puts one foot wrong”

The Woman in the Window doesn’t break away from the conventions of film noir storytelling. Lang features a protagonist who is a well-established and cultured member of society rather than a mobster with a vengeance. Edward G. Robinson stars as Richard Wanley, a psychology professor who enjoys his job and loves his family. Needing a break from work, Wanley sends his wife and children off on a vacation so he can wind down. Suddenly, when walking down a street, an oil portrait of a beautiful femme fatale catches Richard’s eye in a storefront window. Coincidentally, Wanley bumps into the portrait’s subject, Alice Reed (Joan Bennett). They hit it off well, Reed invites Wanley back for some drinks at her apartment which he gladly accepts. What follows next is a classic case of Wanley being in the wrong place at the wrong time: an ex-lover of Reed’s storms into the apartment and strangles Richard out of rage. In self-defence, Wanley repeatedly stabs the lover and he forces himself to cover up the murder. How long can he hide away from this incident until the cops find out about his actions?

Mark Isaacs: Five Films, One Filmmaker

Second Run dropped a bombshell of a box set dedicated to the films of Marc Isaacs, a British documentary filmmaker known for creating closed-off, intimate films with a cast of many memorable and sometimes eccentric personalities. It doesn’t matter if his contributors are small time

Tideland

Look up the word ‘Gilliamesque’ in the dictionary, and you’re likely to find the following descriptions of Terry Gilliam’s wild films. A strong sense of dark humour and visual comedy? Check. Dystopian futures? Double check. Striking fantasy sequences? Triple check. All of these traits are

King of Hearts

Philippe De Broca’s 1966 cult comedy, King of Hearts, is a colourful, charming, and silly little film that fits in line with war-time farces like Richard Attenborough’s Oh, What a Lovely War! In the underlying message of King of Hearts, De Broca is warning us