All posts by Aidan Fatkin

Radio Days

If you want to see an impressive track record from any filmmaker, then Woody Allen shines as one of the most prolific directors of modern times. Since 1982 with A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy, Woody has directed a film each and every year. This is

Review: Varieté

If you type in the term “Unchained camera” into the Wikipedia search bar, you’ll come across a very brief article where it hints that F. W. Murnau, one of the finest directors to come out of the German expressionist film movement, was the creator of

Three Wishes For Cinderella

Everyone has at least one film they watch each and every year once Christmas is on the horizon. Films like Home Alone, It’s a Wonderful Life and A Christmas Story are enjoyed by billions of people all across the world and will continue to remain

The Small World of Sammy Lee

Do you remember Ken Hughes? No? Let me jog your memory. Ken Hughes is the director behind such British films as The Trials of Oscar Wilde, Cromwell, and easily his most famous work, the children’s film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. With the odd exceptions like

Odds Against Tomorrow

Don’t you just get sick of the auteur theory at times? Granted, of course, the theory established some big name directors on the map and helped film-goers spot and narrow down an auteur’s visual style and recurring themes. But over and over again, you can’t

The Clan

Following his stint in the Spanish-language anthology film, 7 Days in Havana which was undertaken by several filmmakers and actors from golden boy, Benicio del Toro to Emir Kusturica. Pablo Trapero returns to the director’s chair with a kaboom in The Clan, Argentina’s entry for

The Secret of Santa Vittoria

Two years after he dropped the critically lauded Sidney Poitier picture, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? Stanley Kramer flew over to Italy to begin what-would-be his next big feature, an adaptation of Robert Crichton’s first novel, The Secret of Santa Vittoria. Kramer, the acclaimed director

The Human Condition

WWII is a frequently used setting throughout the course of cinema history. No matter what, every critically acclaimed filmmaker must have at least one film set in-between the time period of 1939 – 1945. Steven Spielberg presented the horrors of the Holocaust in unflinching black-and-white

Men & Chicken

Scandinavian comedies are perhaps some of the strangest films you’ll ever see, but also magnetic in their charm and quick wit. Whether that would be Stellan Skarsgård as a snow-plow driver going on a killing spree, or a 100 year-old explosive expert escaping from a

Solaris

Andrei Tarkovsky’s third film, following his chilling debut Ivan’s Childhood and the mammoth Andrei Rublev, Solaris is a film that is more about experience and environment than enjoyment or leisure. Clocking in at 2 hours and 40 minutes, this science-fiction voyage into the human soul