All posts by Aidan Fatkin

Shiraz: A Romance of India

When I discuss the golden era of silent film with friends, many adjectives come to mind that describe the movies made in this period. What words can I use, I think to myself? Is it ‘timeless’? ‘Beautiful’? ‘Masterful’? All these adjectives imply that every silent

Orchestra Rehearsal

‘Orchestra Rehearsal’ saw Federico Fellini strip back his surreal tendencies and channelled his energy into something more tangible and less wild. Released in 1978, ‘Orchestra Rehearsal’ is set in one, large, barren hall. A wry voice-over explains that this place was once the burial site

Strangled

Montage Pictures (a subsidiary label of Eureka) debuted with two unheard titles from the outer reaches of world cinema last year; Argyis Papadimitropoulis’s slow-burning drama, ‘Suntan’, and Attila Till’s wheelchair-bound hitman movie, ‘Kills on Wheels’. Following in a similar vein is Árpád Sopsits’s downbeat thriller,

The Cremator

Opening on extreme close-ups of a leopard trapped within a cage, Juraj Herz’s ‘The Cremator’ is the cinematic equivalent of a black hole, it sucks the audience into the warped imagination of Karl Kopfrkingl (Rudolf Hrušínský), who is out on a day trip with his

The Tree of the Wooden Clogs

Ermanno Olmi’s 1978 Palme d’Or winner, ‘The Tree of the Wooden Clogs’, has garnered a reputation for being one of the most underrated Italian films ever made, as well as one of the final films of the Neo-Realist movement. Clocking in at just over 3

Heal the Living

For some, Katell Quillévéré’s third feature film, ‘Heal the Living’, has slotted itself nicely in the honourable mentions for film of the year in 2017. As of writing, Mark Kermode just put out his annual mid-term report of his favourite films from January – June

Westfront 1918 & Kameradschaft

During the late 1920’s to the early 1930’s, G. W. Pabst’s directorial career was on fire. In 1929, he crafted three films. The two Louise Brooks movies that made him synonymous with silent film, ‘Pandora’s Box’ and ‘Diary of a Lost Girl’, and the mountaineering

The Sorrow and the Pity

We British have a very simple way of boiling down WWII in our school history lessons. We were the good-hearted nation prone to stop any violent conflict. The Nazis showed up and did evil things, we went to war with them and we won. But

Rage

After his technically proficient remake of Clint Eastwood’s ‘Unforgiven’, Japanese-Korean director, Lee Sang-il, turns back to the author, Shuichi Yoshida, to film his latest novel, the one-worded ‘Rage’. This is not unfamiliar territory for Sang-il, he previously helmed Yoshida’s ‘Villain’ to great success in 2010