All posts by Rob Simpson

Drunken Master

After the demise of Kong Kong Legends, British fans of martial arts classics were left wanting if they wanted to advance their collection or discover new favourites. Terracotta and 88 films picked up some of the slack but never enough to fill the void left

Brotherhood of Blades

It’s not the language barrier, nor the theatrics and flamboyance, no, the biggest cross for martial arts cinema to bear is context. As a Westerner, many of the nuances of Eastern history allude me, unfortunately, its those very nuances that the historical martial arts film

Bandcamp of the Week #1

Streaming is taking over the world of music with the notion of music ownership becoming and more marginal, whether that be CDs, the resurgent vinyl or that brief pocket of time where the super-hipster reclaimed the cassette. Reports claim that the day of digital music

Lone Wolf and Cub

Hitherto with their UK run, the criterion collection hasn’t released many of their more challenging titles instead opting for classics and cult titles whether that comes from screwball comedies or classic noir. That broader avenue sees Criterion occupy the same arena as Eureka’s Masters of

The Proud Valley

When is an important film at its most important? When it’s not even remotely concerned with any notion of importance. That is a perfect summation of Pen Tennyson’s “The Proud Valley”, out Monday from Studio Canal. The 1940 film stars black political activist Paul Robeson

The Purple Rose of Cairo

As incredulous a comparison as it is, the monoliths that are DC & Marvel have an awful lot in common with that rare, super prolific class of directors which Woody Allen belongs to. Both parties present the uninitiated with an unwieldy mass of titles to

Charlie Chaplin: the Essanay Comedies

Commenting on the ease or difficulty of a review never needs to be brought up because it simply isn’t relevant. However, any notion of hardship from writing such an article typically comes from a need to evade a particularly large plot spoiler. BFI’s Chaplin Essanay’s

Raising Cain

In Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow’s disarmingly forthright documentary, De Palma, its subject talks about the highs and lows of his career. In that one man and his camera documentary, there is one sentence that perfectly encapsulates how modest a man Brian De Palma is.

Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia

Acclaim and success are very different beasts when considering the director, sometimes neither matter and the films they made that chimed with them the most have been overlooked or lost in the shuffle. Take the master of suspense himself, Alfred Hitchcock, his personal favourite was

His Girl Friday

As Howard Hawk’s His Girl Friday opens, we are graced with a silent film style inter-title that announces that the following takes place in a world where Journalists have become an unscrupulous kind who care little of the people around them. What now reads as