All posts by Rob Simpson

The Proud Valley

When is an important film at its most important? When it’s not even remotely concerned with any notion of importance. That is a perfect summation of Pen Tennyson’s “The Proud Valley”, out Monday from Studio Canal. The 1940 film stars black political activist Paul Robeson

The Purple Rose of Cairo

As incredulous a comparison as it is, the monoliths that are DC & Marvel have an awful lot in common with that rare, super prolific class of directors which Woody Allen belongs to. Both parties present the uninitiated with an unwieldy mass of titles to

Charlie Chaplin: the Essanay Comedies

Commenting on the ease or difficulty of a review never needs to be brought up because it simply isn’t relevant. However, any notion of hardship from writing such an article typically comes from a need to evade a particularly large plot spoiler. BFI’s Chaplin Essanay’s

Raising Cain

In Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow’s disarmingly forthright documentary, De Palma, its subject talks about the highs and lows of his career. In that one man and his camera documentary, there is one sentence that perfectly encapsulates how modest a man Brian De Palma is.

Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia

Acclaim and success are very different beasts when considering the director, sometimes neither matter and the films they made that chimed with them the most have been overlooked or lost in the shuffle. Take the master of suspense himself, Alfred Hitchcock, his personal favourite was

His Girl Friday

As Howard Hawk’s His Girl Friday opens, we are graced with a silent film style inter-title that announces that the following takes place in a world where Journalists have become an unscrupulous kind who care little of the people around them. What now reads as

Call of Heroes

Hong Kong Legends was a beacon for fans of martial arts cinema, even though they focused on Golden Harvest and overlooked the Shaw Brothers, their early DVD exploits provided ample chance for us fans to see films that we wouldn’t have otherwise. With their unfortunate

The Man Between

The cooperative forces of the internet and a golden age of home video have put the idea of filmmakers known for one film to bed. Carol Reed was one such director. He was celebrated for the Third Man but with the strength of the Blu-ray

Cinema Eclectica’s Best Home Video of 2016

As well as reviewing the latest releases, our in-house movie podcast, Cinema Eclectica, also acts as your guide to the increasingly labyrinthine home video market. The idea of collecting films isn’t quite the mainstream thing it once was, the rise of streaming and VOD services

Cinema Eclectica’s Top Movies of 2016

This year’s run-down of the best films to hit UK cinemas is a little different than usual. Instead of being the opinion of one person, these 20-ish films are the collective opinion of the 5 people to feature on Cinema Eclectica. That’s Rob, Graham, Ryan,