All posts by Rob Simpson

The Woodsman & The Rain

The Japanese film industry is in a state of instability now, many of the old masters have passed on and the more fashionable names are proving to be inconsistent at best. There a few new names emerging in your Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Sion Sono or Yoshihiro

2013 Movies Preview

2012 is done and dusted; I looked at the best and the rest of last year. The top 10 films I settled on where as diverse as they were remarkable examples showing just how good the world of cinema is at the moment. Even though

2012 in Review: Top Ten

oday is the final day of my series of 2012 posts reviewing the year in cinema, and today it’s the turn of the year’s top 10 films. Just to re-iterate what I have previously said, 2012 has been a brilliant year for films to the

2012 in Review: Worst movies of the year

It’s one thing picking the best films of the year; it’s an altogether easier task too as I could have easily made a top 50 for 2012. Any claims that this year was a bad one for cinema is entirely unfounded. Even so, that doesn’t mean this year didn’t have its

2012 in Review: Honorable Mentions

2012 is over. 365 days, 52 weeks and 162 films: it has now come to the time of the year where those who look at films critically pick the highlights and lowlights of the year’s film releases. There are rules for this type of thing,

Isn’t Anyone Alive?

Sōgo Ishii or as he now known Gakuryū Ishii, is one of the many eccentric visualists of Japanese cinema, with films like Electric Dragon 80,000v. With his latest film, based on a stage play by Shirô Maeda, in isn’t anyone alive? The director has calmed

Petty Romance

Japan isn’t the only country in South-East Asia to have a large comic book and animation industry, South Korea does too. It’s that background what informs the meet cute of Kim Jung-Hoon’s romantic comedy, Petty Romance. Struggling manhwa (Korean comic) artist Jeong Bae (Lee Sun-Kyun) finds out

Kotoko

Kotoko is the latest film from Japanese auteur and grandmaster of the disturbing, Shin’ya Tsukamoto. In the film, Japanese folk musician Cocco stars as the titular character that sees many people twice, one good the other bad, unable to tell the difference between the imaginary

Himizu

After March 2011, director Sion Sono volunteered in Fukushima to do his bit. This postponed the production of his latest project. Afterwards he altered his script of Minoru Furuya’s manga to show the world what really happened that day. Also following on from his ‘hate’