All posts by Matt Colver

Brik Wars: Gloriously Ridiculous Lego Battles

There are reasons I don’t tend to play war games, despite having an unhealthy appetite for moving little tanks and soldiers around a miniature world, cackling maniacally to myself while wearing a general’s hat. The main ones are the high entry cost, the assumption that

Monster Mayhem: When board games go bad

Once a film is successful it will be remade, rebooted, reimagined, prequelled, sequelled, and trequelled with reckless abandon, often with less than stellar results. The end products tend to be weak imitations of the original; the Star Wars prequels, the fourth Indiana Jones film, the

Agatha Christie: Nice Mysteries, Shame About the Prejudice

Agatha Christie has a certain reputation. If you’ve never read her books, you might associate her with twee, cozy, country mysteries featuring genteel and civilised murderers who delicately despatch their victims, perhaps a body in a library, the kind of coffee-table read favoured by older

Locke and Key

Locke and Key is a dark fantasy comic series expertly penned by Joe Hill and beautifully illustrated by Gabriel Rodriguez. With gorgeous artwork and a strong narrative, this is superb storytelling through sequential art. Be warned though – here be dragons. Horror, bloodshed and brutality

Mice and Mystics

Mice and Mystics is a cooperative role-playing board game, heavily inspired by Dungeons and Dragons. It’s simpler and more accessible than its sword and sorcery predecessor, offering a mix of story-telling and dice rolling. A spiritual successor to games like HeroQuest, with action akin to

Android Netrunner

One of the common complaints about table-top games which fall outside of the traditional mould is that they are overcomplicated and inaccessible. While this is often unfair and causes people to miss out on some great games, there are some that, unfortunately, live up to

The Sandman: Neil Gaiman’s Dream Epic

The Sandman is a comic series written by Neil Gaiman which was first published in the late 80s and early 90s. Rightly considered to be ground-breaking, and beloved by its fans, it also has a reputation for being highbrow, dense and inaccessible. So is it