Category Archives: Reviews

Phenomena

Whether or not he was the best director remains to be seen, when the topic of the Giallo comes up one of the first names to come up is Dario Argento. Even if his career took a near-legendary nosedive in the late 1980s-early 1990s, his

New World

Crime movies are a captivating microcosm, there are vast differences to be found depending on where in the world a specific title was made. When you go further afield than American and British there are big differences too be found. Hong Kong Crime Movies saw

The Geek Show - A Conversation About Fire Emblem Warriors

A Conversation About Fire Emblem Warriors

Fire Emblem has long been a fantasy RPG bastion for Nintendo, but how does the franchise fare when Omega Force and Team Ninja get their hands on it and apply a little of their “Musou Magic”? On order to find out Mark and Rob take

The Geek Show - A Conversation About Senran Kagura Peach Beach Splash

A Conversation About Senran Kagura: Peach Beach Splash

If you’re in the mood for some mild ecchi then return with us to the probably-not-safe-for-work-but-full-of-ninjas-for-some-reason world of Senran Kagura for a look at Peach Beach Splash on the PS4. Is it good? Is it bad? Does it jiggle in disturbing/distracting ways? Join Mark and

The Apartment

In a 1995 interview packaged as part of Arrow Academy’s new restoration of The Apartment, Billy Wilder remembers a scene from David Lean’s Brief Encounter, a ‘black and white, very simple’ movie that he considers one of that director’s greatest. He and I have very

78/52: Hitchcock’s Shower Scene

Is there a scene more ingrained into the popular consciousness than the shower scene from Psycho? That question is answered by Documentarian Alexandre O. Philippe in his film 78/52. He applies a laser focus on those 78 setups and 52 cuts to discuss this watershed

Pulp

It is a film about the abuse of a young girl by people in positions of power and the cover up this corruptible high society instigate to ensure they are never held to account for the crime they have committed.  It is a film that

The Cremator

Opening on extreme close-ups of a leopard trapped within a cage, Juraj Herz’s ‘The Cremator’ is the cinematic equivalent of a black hole, it sucks the audience into the warped imagination of Karl Kopfrkingl (Rudolf Hrušínský), who is out on a day trip with his