Category Archives: Movies & Documentaries

Brotherhood of Blades

It’s not the language barrier, nor the theatrics and flamboyance, no, the biggest cross for martial arts cinema to bear is context. As a Westerner many of the nuances of Eastern history allude me, unfortunately its those very nuances that the historical martial arts film

The Lady from Shanghai

Orson Welles once claimed he only saw thrillers as a means to an end, that if it wasn’t for the unfortunate necessity of getting films funded he wouldn’t have made any. As if to demonstrate this, he would often tell a story about the genesis

Lost In France

The music industry is full of holy grail moments. A significant, chance meeting that launches a band that goes on to change the world, a landmark album, a legendary gig or the promise of what might have been.  It doesn’t matter what band, singer or

Shadows and Fog

One year following his overlooked 1990 film, Alice, Woody Allen followed that up with his tribute film towards the German expressionist film movement, Shadows and Fog. As the title suggests, Allen and cinematographer, Carlo Di Palma, soak the film in a misty and darkened b/w

Lone Wolf and Cub

Hitherto with their UK run, the criterion collection hasn’t released many of their more challenging titles instead opting for classics and cult titles whether that comes from screwball comedies or classic noir. That broader avenue sees Criterion occupy the same arena as Eureka’s Masters of

Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore

Ellen Burstyn was riding high off the back of The Exorcist and looking for a prospective project to make with Warner Brothers when Robert Getchell’s script for what was to become Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore fell into her lap. It was the early 1970s

The Proud Valley

When is an important film at its most important? When it’s not even remotely concerned with any notion of importance. That is a perfect summation of Pen Tennyson’s “The Proud Valley”, out Monday from Studio Canal. The 1940 film stars black political activist Paul Robeson

Who’s That Knocking At My Door

Who’s That Knocking At My Door, Martin Scorsese’s black and white debut feature film from 1968, originally started out life as his NYU graduation project some three years earlier. Aged just 23, armed with a miniscule budget and relying on numerous favours, Scorsese took to

My Twentieth Century

“We live in the flicker”, Joseph Conrad famously wrote, referring to the breathless speed of technological advancement in the crossover from nineteenth to twentieth century.  In addressing the same historical period, Ildikó Enyedi’s debut film My Twentieth Century – released on DVD and Blu-Ray by

Two Rode Together

The celebrated director John Ford once said of his overlooked 1961 film, Two Rode Together as “the worst piece of crap I’ve made in twenty years”. It’s understandable why he would say something like this as production for Two Rode Together was far from an