Category Archives: Movies & Documentaries

The General

In 2016, Eureka re-issued their wonderful collection of Buster Keaton shorts and in that not only can you find the genesis of big-screen comedy, you can also find the work of a man experimenting with effects and stunt work decades ahead of its time. Two

Sherlock Jr

The shortest of Buster Keaton’s features, the 45-minute Sherlock Jr. is only five minutes longer than the Oscars’ stated limit for short films (not that they existed back then). It had been conceived and shot as a six-reel feature, but Keaton deleted two of those

Witchhammer

Reality is something to be surpassed in horror. The promotional line of being based on a ‘true story’ is something which is used as a basic inspiration point as illustrated by the original Amityville and Conjuring movies or the countless identikit exorcism films using this

Manina, the Lighthouse-Keeper’s Daughter

Let’s get the big issue out of the way first: Eureka’s new Blu-Ray release of Manina, the Lighthouse-Keeper’s Daughter by Willy Rozier boasts the most unexpected and delightful extra feature of the year. It actually pertains not to the title feature, but to another Rozier

Body Heat

Body Heat opens on the scene of a distant burning restaurant as a witness, Ned Racine (William Hurt), watches from a bedroom window. As a kid, his family were regular diners there. Now, he sardonically speculates that the arsonist is one of his corrupt clients.

A Clockwork Orange

I guess A Clockwork Orange is something akin to a movie buff’s ‘Where were you when Kennedy was shot?’ moment. Every self-respecting film devotee from the UK is likely to recall the first time they watched Stanley Kubrick’s controversial masterpiece and, if you’re of a

The Wall

Thankfully not a film about Trump’s intentions regarding the US/Mexico border, The Wall is, in fact, a tense, psychological war movie from director Doug Liman. The Wall is essentially a three-hander (though in truth the vast chunk of its running time sees it operate more

Voice of the Moon

By an odd coincidence, 1990 saw the release of two films called Voice of the Moon, one of which saw the beginning of a directorial career, the other saw the end of it. The first was a short documentary by Richard Stanley about his travels

House of Wax (1953)

James Cameron has a lot to answer for, off the back of Avatar’s success film fans have been subjected to a decade of shoehorned 3D features. The only films still clinging on to this concept are the superhero mega-blockbusters, otherwise, 3D has well and truly

The Crazies (1973)

To celebrate the life of George A. Romero, Arrow Video have released a box set of three films called between Night and Dawn. It could just as easily be called ‘more than just night and dawn’ as Romero was largely overlooked outside of the Night