Category Archives: Movies & Documentaries

12 Angry Men

Does 12 Angry Men really need an introduction? The short answer would be no, but Sidney Lumet’s first feature has gone down in history as not only one of the greatest directorial debuts of all-time but also as one of the most important one location

Melody (1971)

Also known as S.W.A.L.K., Waris Hussein’s adaptation of Alan Parker’s script, Melody is a film that belongs to a tradition of films that are just ripe for cheap jokes from film critics. It has been seen countless times before when films have a title that

Guardians of the Galaxy, vol. 2 (Contains Spoilers)

After the unexpected hit that was its predecessor, Guardians of the Galaxy: Volume 2 had a lot to live up to. Though Guardians isn’t as tethered to the larger MCU as other films and therefore doesn’t have an onslaught of Easter Eggs and set-ups weighing

Phantasm

There’s a loathable and inescapable truth in discussing the legacy of the horror franchise. Those titles with a tangible look, whether it’s the pallid white mask of Halloween’s Michael Myers, the grotesque abominations of Hellraiser’s Cenobites or the red and black sweater/bladed glove combo of

The Informer

There are features on the disc and in the booklet accompanying the BFI’s new dual format release of Arthur Robison’s 1929 thriller The Informer describing how long and careful the restoration process was.  Just as well; anyone under the delusion that a silent film could be

Letter to Brezhnev

Call me a sentimental old northerner, but the opening to Letter to Brezhnev remains one of my favourite moments of celluloid. Whilst budgetary constraints mean that it may not be as epic as it clearly wants to be, it nevertheless understands that Liverpool is a

Drunken Master

After the demise of Kong Kong Legends, British fans of martial arts classics were left wanting if they wanted to advance their collection or discover new favourites. Terracotta and 88 films picked up some of the slack but never enough to fill the void left

Experiment in Terror

Blake Edwards’ 1962 thriller, Experiment in Terror, opens on the night skyline of San Francisco. Lines of traffic cruise down the highway in the pitch black with Henry Mancini’s haunting and sinister score lumbering in the background. It then cuts to a suburb with a

Brotherhood of Blades

It’s not the language barrier, nor the theatrics and flamboyance, no, the biggest cross for martial arts cinema to bear is context. As a Westerner, many of the nuances of Eastern history allude me, unfortunately, its those very nuances that the historical martial arts film