Category Archives: Movies & Documentaries

The Lair of The White Worm

Ken Russell is a bit of a devil. In all his films you can see an unabashed joy of sex, life, and kitsch whilst having the underlying thread of Christianity throughout; explicitly or otherwise. Lair of the White Worm is no exception but, against his

Ice Cold in Alex

According to some, Ice Cold In Alex is one of the most beloved British war films of the 1950s. StudioCanal seem to think so; they’ve released a new 4k restoration to mark the 60th anniversary of its release. Count me among those for whom, up

Orchestra Rehearsal

‘Orchestra Rehearsal’ saw Federico Fellini strip back his surreal tendencies and channelled his energy into something more tangible and less wild. Released in 1978, ‘Orchestra Rehearsal’ is set in one, large, barren hall. A wry voice-over explains that this place was once the burial site


London based actress Mercedes Grower makes her screenwriting and directorial debut with Brakes, a film that couldn’t be any more lo-fi if it tried. Episodic and improvisational in feel, Brakes is a multi-stranded ensemble piece that explores what it is to fall in and out

Twin Peaks: The Return: The Rewatch – Gotta light?

We were warned this was coming. On Instagram Peter Deming, who shot The Return (as well as Lost Highway and Mulholland Drive) said that episode 8 would be unlike anything else you’ve ever seen. In the comments, Sky Ferreira and Amy Shiels said they’d heard

Carl Th. Dreyer’s Michael

When’s a good time to reissue a film? Had Eureka Masters of Cinema put out this Blu-Ray reissue of Carl Theodor Dreyer’s Michael last year, it might have been a valuable contribution to the fiftieth anniversary of the decriminalisation of homosexuality in Britain. As it

The Colour of Pomegranates

It’s a very large box for a very short film. Maybe you find that challenging, or intimidating, or mind-numbing, or somewhere between all three. If so, I’m not exactly sweetening the pot if I tell you that the film is a series of oblique, poetic

Sword of Doom

The title of any given movie is supremely important, as many adage’s state first impressions matter and for any film that title is where we make that impression. Looking at the UK catalog of Criterion, we can separate a movie title into two camps –

House (Hausu)

There’s a tiresome tendency among Westerners to squeal “wtf japan lol” every time a Japanese film exhibits a minor eccentricity, but sometimes you have to acknowledge a film is very strange.  That’s the case with 1977’s House, now released on Blu-Ray by Eureka Masters of Cinema.