Category Archives: Movies & Documentaries

Isn’t Anyone Alive?

Sōgo Ishii or as he now known Gakuryū Ishii, is one of the many eccentric visualists of Japanese cinema, with films like Electric Dragon 80,000v. With his latest film, based on a stage play by Shirô Maeda, in isn’t anyone alive? The director has calmed

Petty Romance

Japan isn’t the only country in South-East Asia to have a large comic book and animation industry, South Korea does too. It’s that background what informs the meet cute of Kim Jung-Hoon’s romantic comedy, Petty Romance. Struggling manhwa (Korean comic) artist Jeong Bae (Lee Sun-Kyun) finds out

Kotoko

Kotoko is the latest film from Japanese auteur and grandmaster of the disturbing, Shin’ya Tsukamoto. In the film, Japanese folk musician Cocco stars as the titular character that sees many people twice, one good the other bad, unable to tell the difference between the imaginary

Himizu

After March 2011, director Sion Sono volunteered in Fukushima to do his bit. This postponed the production of his latest project. Afterwards he altered his script of Minoru Furuya’s manga to show the world what really happened that day. Also following on from his ‘hate’

War of the Arrows

Director Han-min Kim’s film The War of the Arrows is something of a rarity in the international reputation of Korean cinema as its focus lies on the second Manchurian invasion of Korea, the Joseon Kingdom in particular. In layman’s terms, the War of the Arrows is about the second

Boca Do Lixo

City of God brought Brazilian cinema into the public consciousness and following on from it there has been a series of gangland thrillers, a strange case of a country typecasting itself, similar to South Korea and its relationship with the revenge thriller. The newest Brazilian

Red Light Revolution

The trouble with reviewing a comedy film is that it’s much like observing a particle: the act of reviewing can cloud and alter the reader’s perception. To explain a joke or gag without context could potentially damage the humor. This film however has created the

Hoshi wo Ou Kodomo

Stories about the dead coming back to life are a dime a dozen these days, mainly because of the current fascination with zombies and vampires, but rarely do we see a tale that’s more akin to the legends of old, where mighty heroes brave the

Red Hill

Directed by Patrick Hughes, Red Hill is Australia’s latest contribution to the Western. Shane Cooper (Ryan Kwanten) and his pregnant wife move away from the hustle of the police force in the big city to Red Hill. Unbeknownst to Shane he was walked into a town

Gallants

In Clement Cheng’s directorial debut we have Gallants, homage to all things 70s Kung Fu and Shaw Brothers, much in the same way that Kung Fu Hustle was only this is a much more restrained and solemn piece of film making. As the films narration goes on to describe, Gallants is the story of loser, Cheung (You-Nam Wong) who cannot do his job as an estate agent. He is constantly causing trouble for his bosses, so to get rid of him he is sent off into the Chinese countryside to resolve a dispute on the rental of a property. When he gets there he causes a dispute to be elevated to the point where it becomes a full-blown face off. Along the way there are love-interests, training montages and loss. All of these things are common place in the martial arts genre, so don’t expect the film to say anything new through its narrative.