Category Archives: Movies & Documentaries

Goto, Isle of Love

The second feature in Arrow’s extensive restoration of Walerian Borowczyk’s work, Goto, Isle of Love is a live-action French film that cannot be anything other than the work of a Polish animator. Its venomous contempt for authority and its poker-faced sense of humour are both

Story of my Death

There’s an inherent risk to saying this on the internet these days, but here we go: sometimes spoilers aren’t a bad thing. Every single synopsis or review I’ve read of Albert Serra’s seventh feature film, Story of My Death, mentions a character who doesn’t turn

Walerian Borowczyk Short Films and Animation

The story of Michael Brooke’s [EDIT – actually Daniel Bird; see comments section] restoration of the films of Walerian Borowczyk deserves to be film-restorer’s folklore by now, a Cinderella story about one of cinema’s least Disney-esque animators. After facing plenty of indifference, Brooke turned to

Be My Baby

Those who harp on about how awful soap operas are and how the trifecta of Emmerdale, Coronation Street and Eastenders are suffocating TV schedules should spare a thought for people of a similar disposition in Japan. The industry of the soap opera is much bigger

Paper Moon

Films that trade in retro-fetishism have become a commodity post-2010, with a countless barrage either slavishly replicating or parodying bygone ages – with a keen eye fixated on the 1980s. Such films have escaped the cult domain and penetrated the mainstream, truly the mark that

Polish Cinema Vol. III

One of the key dilemmas faced by anyone looking to distribute or exhibit foreign-language cinema is this: do you distribute films that offers insights into a different culture, or do you distribute films that are universal? The former, of course, is something that many arthouse

Tokyo Tribe

Nobody has quite the same grasp on the enfant terrible director as Japan: the 1960s and 70s had Seijun Suzuki and Kinji Fukusaku; the modern-day has Takashi Miike and the ever unpredictable Sion Sono. Japanese cinema has never had to try hard to find a

Han Gong-Ju

The Korean New Wave was primarily defined by three directors, Kim Jee-Woon, Park Chan-Wook and Bong Joon-Ho, with the three of them being courted to foreign climes the international stature of this national wave of cinema has significantly atrophied. Korean cinema isn’t the cool new

Fruit of Paradise

The utterly unique career of Věra Chytilová, and the story of Czech cinema in general, finds itself at a crossroads with 1970’s Fruit of Paradise, now released on DVD by Second Run Films. It feels like the product of a golden age; as noted in

Electricity

Right at the start of Bryn Higgins’s sophomore film, there’s a credit for the Wellcome Trust as producers. Having one of the world’s largest financiers of cutting-edge medical research in your opening credits sets out a mission statement; when it comes to medical accuracy, this