Category Archives: Reviews

The Sorrow and the Pity

We British have a very simple way of boiling down WWII in our school history lessons. We were the good-hearted nation prone to stop any violent conflict. The Nazis showed up and did evil things, we went to war with them and we won. But

Aquarius

What I will say about Aquarius, the latest film from Brazilian filmmaker Kleber Mendonça Filho, is that it is an absorbing, detailed and considerate character study of its female protagonist – and more, that protagonist happens to be a woman in her mid-sixties. There really isn’t

Is it just nostalgia?: Metroid (NES)

E3 was huge for Nintendo fans, for finally it was announced that they would be given not one but two new Metroid titles in both Metroid Prime 4 for the Switch and Metroid: Samus Returns for the 3DS. Metroid has been a long beloved franchise

Doctor Who Episode 12 | The Doctor Falls

Written by Steven Moffat | Directed by Rachel Talalay It’s OK everyone. Bill can come back. Y’all can breathe again. Hands down my favourite episode of the series so far and potentially the best finale we’ve seen in a while ‘The Doctor Falls’ proves that

The Levelling

It would be wrong to say British film hasn’t dealt with the countryside, but it certainly hasn’t dealt with it in any depth. For the first half-century or so of British cinema it might as well have been a painted backdrop, just some pretty, quintessentially

Stormy Monday

It would probably be impossible to make a genuinely anti-American film; as with rock and roll, the USA has contributed so much to the history of the art form that any political stance has to be tempered by the sheer cultural debt. Mike Figgis’s debut

Rage

After his technically proficient remake of Clint Eastwood’s ‘Unforgiven’, Japanese-Korean director, Lee Sang-il, turns back to the author, Shuichi Yoshida, to film his latest novel, the one-worded ‘Rage’. This is not unfamiliar territory for Sang-il, he previously helmed Yoshida’s ‘Villain’ to great success in 2010

Doberman Cop

Once upon a time, it was instantly apparent when a film was based on a comic or graphic novel as those films concerned themselves with the super-powered and the otherworldly, then around the mid-1990s there was a paradigm shift and the nature of these titles

Daughters of the Dust

Julie Dash’s debut film turned 25 last year, but even without the anniversary this sumptuous BFI restoration would still probably exist. In the late 2010s, the film has become more relevant than ever. It is an inspiration for a new generation of African-American directors –

In This Corner of the World

It’s been a great past year for fans of Anime movies, with ‘Your Name’ taking the world by storm and being followed up by the equally impressive ‘A Silent Voice’ not long after. Thrown into the mix was new installments in the Yu-Gi-Oh, Fairy Tail