Category Archives: Reviews

Saturday Night and Sunday Morning

There comes a point in the life of a teenager when you have to leave the books of your childhood behind and venture into the great unknown of adult literature. It’s a big move, as the books and authors you find there could not only

The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou

I have a strong love for Wes Anderson’s films as they have an odd, quirky feel to each of them. He has a knack for making some of the most mundane aspects of life seem fun and nostalgic; like your first love or a job

Dark River

She’s got armfuls of good reviews and her films have opened at Cannes, but it still feels like people don’t recognise how good Clio Barnard is. Among her peers, Andrea Arnold is the heir apparent of social realist cinema, Ben Wheatley has the genre fans

Modern Romance

On paper, Albert Brooks’s Modern Romance sounds like a trivial, run-of-the-mill romantic comedy following a film editor trying to fix his relationship with his former girlfriend. In execution though, Brooks understands that clichéd plotting won’t get him anywhere in his second directorial effort. Brooks’s Modern

Girl With Green Eyes

When we think of Woodfall films we invariably think of the drama genre, unique to the British film industry, known as ‘kitchen sink’.  After all, it was a genre they had certainly made their name off the back of, with an impressive track record straight

A Ciambra

A spectre is haunting cinema— the spectre of Italian neorealism. Spectral, because despite the critical and cultural ripples made by films like The Florida Project, American Honey, and Valeska Grisebach’s Western, these non-professional actors, semi-real situations and hitherto unexplored settings tend to be forgotten by

Iron Monkey

If DVDs wore out like VHS did, my old Hong Kong Legends Iron Monkey DVD would’ve been degraded to the degree that it’d probably play more like a bootleg than a legitimate release. Everyone has movies like that, movies where you know you want to

Look Back in Anger

When I was a kid, the Liverpudlian comedian Mick Miller used to tell a joke I still regard fondly to this day. He’d stand on stage before the microphone and say “And now, name that film”. He’d then turn his back to them and, looking

Jubilee

And so time marches on, stopping only to produce ironies. Derek Jarman’s Jubilee, its very title a sarcastic reference to Queen Elizabeth II’s twenty-five years in office, is reissued by the BFI on dual format for its own ruby anniversary. The disc is released a

The Defiant Ones

This summer, you might have already seen two very different people, chained together, forced to co-operate in order to escape their captivity. They even climbed out of a mud-pit; if you weren’t thinking about The Defiant Ones (about two chain-gang prisoners, one white and one