Tag Archives: Andrei Tarkovsky

Loveless

Russian cinema is certainly one for its figureheads. Sergei Eisenstein was instrumental in many theories that would go on to establish the cinematic language. Andrei Tarkovsky established and nigh on perfected the arthouse. And since his passing there wasn’t really much of a centerpiece for

Silence and Cry

First-time viewers of Miklós Jancsó’s 1968 film Silence and Cry, reissued on Blu-Ray and DVD by Second Run, will be greeted by something they might not expect from the veteran Hungarian director – a montage. Don’t worry, it doesn’t last. The rest of the film

Sword of Doom

The title of any given movie is supremely important, as many adage’s state first impressions matter and for any film that title is where we make that impression. Looking at the UK catalog of Criterion, we can separate a movie title into two camps –

Vampir Cuadecuc

Some time in the early 2000s, a Peruvian government spokesman was forced to testily deny online rumours that some of the country’s cabinet were vampires. “A government cannot go around sucking the blood of its people”, the spokesman claimed, inviting the obvious rejoinder; which government

Cinema Eclectica’s Best Home Video of 2016

As well as reviewing the latest releases, our in-house movie podcast, Cinema Eclectica, also acts as your guide to the increasingly labyrinthine home video market. The idea of collecting films isn’t quite the mainstream thing it once was, the rise of streaming and VOD services

The Sacrifice

Released just six months before his death from cancer, Andrei Tarkovsky’s The Sacrifice is commonly held to be an uncomfortably elegiac, melancholy note for the great director to bow out on, which considering the rest of his films were hardly Duck Soup is saying something.

Nostalgia

Curzon Artificial Eye releases the penultimate film from Andrei Tarkovsky’s body of work in Nostalgia and its something of an enigma. Post-Stalker, Tarkovsky planned to make a film called The First Day which concerned itself with atheism in the Soviet Union, long story short, he

Stalker

Solaris got the remake, Andrei Rublev got the Vatican’s thumbs-up, and Mirror famously caused Lars von Trier to declare Andrei Tarkovsky was God.  But the biggest cultural footprint of all the Russian director’s seven feature films undoubtedly belongs to Stalker.  His adaptation of Arkady and Boris