Tag Archives: Arrow Video

The Crazies (1973)

To celebrate the life of George A. Romero, Arrow Video have released a box set of three films called between Night and Dawn. It could just as easily be called ‘more than just night and dawn’ as Romero was largely overlooked outside of the Night

J.D.’s Revenge

One of the many rare and cherishable things about Jordan Peele’s Get Out was that it was a horror movie with an African-American lead that nevertheless wasn’t pitched or marketed as the black version of any pre-existing horror film. After Night of the Living Dead,

Shaft (1971)

Few things in pop culture have an associated piece of music that precedes it as widely as Shaft. Isaac Hayes legendary and academy recognised score and song is identifiable from its first few bars and with good reason too, Hayes is one of the kings

Erik the Conqueror

In “Gli Imatori”, a visual essay featured in an uncharacteristically spartan selection of arrow video features, Michael Mackenzie comments on Italian cinema’s propensity to copy (escape from New York becomes 2019: After the Fall of New York, for example) as this latest Mario Bava title

Stormy Monday

It would probably be impossible to make a genuinely anti-American film; as with rock and roll, the USA has contributed so much to the history of the art form that any political stance has to be tempered by the sheer cultural debt. Mike Figgis’s debut

Doberman Cop

Once upon a time, it was instantly apparent when a film was based on a comic or graphic novel as those films concerned themselves with the super-powered and the otherworldly, then around the mid-1990s there was a paradigm shift and the nature of these titles

The Bird with the Crystal Plumage

Dario Argento is synonymous with the Giallo (Heavily stylised Italian Murder/Slasher) whereby one of his latter day and inferior films carries the very same moniker, similarly, his directorial debut the Bird with the Crystal Plumage counts among the most acclaimed and beloved movies in the

Phantasm

There’s a loathable and inescapable truth in discussing the legacy of the horror franchise. Those titles with a tangible look, whether it’s the pallid white mask of Halloween’s Michael Myers, the grotesque abominations of Hellraiser’s Cenobites or the red and black sweater/bladed glove combo of

Lone Wolf and Cub

Hitherto with their UK run, the criterion collection hasn’t released many of their more challenging titles instead opting for classics and cult titles whether that comes from screwball comedies or classic noir. That broader avenue sees Criterion occupy the same arena as Eureka’s Masters of