Tag Archives: Arrow Video

Phenomena

Whether or not he was the best director remains to be seen, when the topic of the Giallo comes up one of the first names to come up is Dario Argento. Even if his career took a near-legendary nosedive in the late 1980s-early 1990s, his

Pulp

It is a film about the abuse of a young girl by people in positions of power and the cover up this corruptible high society instigate to ensure they are never held to account for the crime they have committed.  It is a film that

The Witch Who Came from the Sea

Newly released as a stand-alone Blu-Ray by Arrow, The Witch Who Came From the Sea was previously part of Arrow’s American Horror Project Vol. 1 along with Malatesta’s Carnival of Blood and The Premonition.  It’s a much less comfortable fit within the horror genre than those

The Crazies (1973)

To celebrate the life of George A. Romero, Arrow Video have released a box set of three films called between Night and Dawn. It could just as easily be called ‘more than just night and dawn’ as Romero was largely overlooked outside of the Night

J.D.’s Revenge

One of the many rare and cherishable things about Jordan Peele’s Get Out was that it was a horror movie with an African-American lead that nevertheless wasn’t pitched or marketed as the black version of any pre-existing horror film. After Night of the Living Dead,

Shaft (1971)

Few things in pop culture have an associated piece of music that precedes it as widely as Shaft. Isaac Hayes legendary and academy recognised score and song is identifiable from its first few bars and with good reason too, Hayes is one of the kings

Erik the Conqueror

In “Gli Imatori”, a visual essay featured in an uncharacteristically spartan selection of arrow video features, Michael Mackenzie comments on Italian cinema’s propensity to copy (escape from New York becomes 2019: After the Fall of New York, for example) as this latest Mario Bava title

Stormy Monday

It would probably be impossible to make a genuinely anti-American film; as with rock and roll, the USA has contributed so much to the history of the art form that any political stance has to be tempered by the sheer cultural debt. Mike Figgis’s debut

Doberman Cop

Once upon a time, it was instantly apparent when a film was based on a comic or graphic novel as those films concerned themselves with the super-powered and the otherworldly, then around the mid-1990s there was a paradigm shift and the nature of these titles