Tag Archives: BFi

Two Woodfall films and an American equivalent

Yes, I am yoking three reviews and three films together, but bear with me, and we can ride on this makeshift oxcart together. It’s not just that two of them are from the BFI’s Woodfall collection, a recent boxed set of British New Wave classics;

Loneliness of a Long Distance Runner

Based on Alan Sillitoe’s 1959 first person short story of the same name, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner was an obvious choice for Woodfall Films following the success they had had with a previous adaptation of a Sillitoe novel; Saturday Night and Sunday

Girl With Green Eyes

When we think of Woodfall films we invariably think of the drama genre, unique to the British film industry, known as ‘kitchen sink’.  After all, it was a genre they had certainly made their name off the back of, with an impressive track record straight

Look Back in Anger

When I was a kid, the Liverpudlian comedian Mick Miller used to tell a joke I still regard fondly to this day. He’d stand on stage before the microphone and say “And now, name that film”. He’d then turn his back to them and, looking

They Came To A City

I’m not really a big fan of overtly political works since they can force an idea upon the viewer. Other times a film or television series that is based on politics but isn’t political is something that I could get behind. So I had a

An Actor’s Revenge

It’s late Edo-period Japan. An acting troupe from Osaka has arrived in the capital city to perform. Thieves and pickpockets stalk their prey among the paying audience, while merchants and aristocrats watch from the balcony seats. Yukinojo, a slightly paunchy onnagata (kabuki actor who plays

Hotel Salvation

It’s not easy being an independent film-maker anywhere in the world, but spare a thought for Indian directors outside the system.  This should be their time: films like Chaitanya Tamhane’s Court have cleaned up at international film festivals, while directors like Anurag Kashyap (Gangs of Wasseypur),

Shiraz: A Romance of India

When I discuss the golden era of silent film with friends, many adjectives come to mind that describe the movies made in this period. What words can I use, I think to myself? Is it ‘timeless’? ‘Beautiful’? ‘Masterful’? All these adjectives imply that every silent