Tag Archives: Biopic

Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters

An extraordinary film even by the standards of Criterion’s UK catalogue, Paul Schrader’s Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters is your go-to film to counter accusations that biopics are inherently stuffy, stylistically conservative Oscar-bait. And it’s all thanks to Hank Williams. After surviving the excesses

Ip Man: The Final Fight

Folk Heroes are such huge figures of Chinese culture that to western eyes it may look like the milking of a particularly bounteous cash cow, look at Wong Fei Hung & Fong Sai-Yuk – between them we are looking at hundreds of titles. Both of

Jinnah

Has any genre been as cursed by its own success as the biopic?  The very first feature-length film, Charles Tait’s The Story of the Kelly Gang, falls into the category, as do agreed-upon high culture classics like Carl Theodor Dreyer’s The Passion of Joan of

Edvard Munch

As someone who works primarily in the documentary form, Peter Watkins probably doesn’t get asked where he gets his ideas.  Not that there’s any need to – his 1974 epic Edvard Munch, released on Blu-Ray by Eureka Masters of Cinema, is the story of an

Madame Dubarry (1919)

Ernst Lubitsch isn’t remembered for the silent work which Eureka’s Masters of Cinema is concerning themselves with at present, instead his name carries traction as a result of his famous light dramatic comedies of the 1930’s and 40s (To be or not to be, Trouble