Tag Archives: Blu Ray

The Bird with the Crystal Plumage

Dario Argento is synonymous with the Giallo (Heavily stylised Italian Murder/Slasher) whereby one of his latter day and inferior films carries the very same moniker, similarly, his directorial debut the Bird with the Crystal Plumage counts among the most acclaimed and beloved movies in the

Graduation (Bacalaureat)

Despite some questionable actions, it’s hard not to feel sorry for  Adrian Titieni’s Dr Romeo Aldea in award winning director Cristian Mungiu’s film Graduation (or Bacalaureat as it is known in its native Romania); weighed down by middle age and with only his good reputation to comfort

Spotlight on a Murderer

Whether it’s Agatha Christie or the likes of Law & Order and NCIS commanding TV schedules today, the murder mystery is one of the dominant genres in narrative media. Literally, every conceivable police department has been imagined in every major city, then there are the

Mulholland Drive

“Nah, you’re not thinkin’. You’re too busy being a smart-alec to be thinkin’” – The Cowboy If you’ve never seen David Lynch’s 2001 Cannes Best Director winner Mulholland Drive, it’s probably worth stopping reading and buying Studio Canal’s new Blu-Ray restoration right now. That’s normally

Film / NotFilm

Playwright Samuel Beckett’s only foray into filmmaking, the aptly titled Film is a 1965 silent short starring the famed movie clown, Buster Keaton. Before anyone makes any assumptions, no, this is not a comedy that made Keaton famous during the golden age of silent cinema

Phantasm

There’s a loathable and inescapable truth in discussing the legacy of the horror franchise. Those titles with a tangible look, whether it’s the pallid white mask of Halloween’s Michael Myers, the grotesque abominations of Hellraiser’s Cenobites or the red and black sweater/bladed glove combo of

The Informer

There are features on the disc and in the booklet accompanying the BFI’s new dual format release of Arthur Robison’s 1929 thriller The Informer describing how long and careful the restoration process was.  Just as well; anyone under the delusion that a silent film could be

Letter to Brezhnev

Call me a sentimental old northerner, but the opening to Letter to Brezhnev remains one of my favourite moments of celluloid. Whilst budgetary constraints mean that it may not be as epic as it clearly wants to be, it nevertheless understands that Liverpool is a

Drunken Master

After the demise of Kong Kong Legends, British fans of martial arts classics were left wanting if they wanted to advance their collection or discover new favourites. Terracotta and 88 films picked up some of the slack but never enough to fill the void left

The Proud Valley

When is an important film at its most important? When it’s not even remotely concerned with any notion of importance. That is a perfect summation of Pen Tennyson’s “The Proud Valley”, out Monday from Studio Canal. The 1940 film stars black political activist Paul Robeson