Tag Archives: Blu Ray

The Proud Valley

When is an important film at its most important? When it’s not even remotely concerned with any notion of importance. That is a perfect summation of Pen Tennyson’s the proud valley, out Monday from Studio Canal. The 1940 film stars black political activist Paul Robeson

My Twentieth Century

“We live in the flicker”, Joseph Conrad famously wrote, referring to the breathless speed of technological advancement in the crossover from nineteenth to twentieth century.  In addressing the same historical period, Ildikó Enyedi’s debut film My Twentieth Century – released on DVD and Blu-Ray by

Two Rode Together

The celebrated director John Ford once said of his overlooked 1961 film, Two Rode Together as “the worst piece of crap I’ve made in twenty years”. It’s understandable why he would say something like this as production for Two Rode Together was far from an

Story of Sin

Story of Sin begins with a quintessentially Walerian Borowczyk image; the doors of a church confessional booth being opened.  Already, we can see so many things that fascinate this director, from what’s on screen (the frame-within-a-frame, the old-fashioned handmade props and sets) to the implicit (the unlocking

Alice

In his book Crackpot, John Waters devotes a chapter to his guilty pleasure movies – the joke being that the trash cinema most people would describe as a guilty pleasure is exactly what you’d expect Waters to unashamedly love.  Instead, the chapter is devoted to achingly

Raising Cain

In Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow’s disarmingly forthright documentary, De Palma, its subject talks about the highs and lows of his career. In that one man and his camera documentary, there is one sentence that perfectly encapsulates how modest a man Brian De Palma is.

The Glass Shield

African-American cinema’s relationship to the American mainstream is kind of like Halley’s comet; it’s always there, it’s just not always visible.  Charles Burnett’s career has lasted long enough to intersect with two major movements in black cinema; he may yet connect with the ongoing one.  After

The Cabinet of Dr Caligari

The film with the wonky sets?  Yes, the film with the wonky sets – but Robert Wiene’s silent horror landmark has so much more to offer, and that’s never been as apparent as it will be when you watch Eureka Masters of Cinema’s new loaded-up

The Man Between

The cooperative forces of the internet and a golden age of home video have put the idea of filmmakers known for one film to bed. Carol Reed was one such director. He was celebrated for the Third Man but with the strength of the Blu-ray

The Blue Lamp

Whether or not the name is familiar, Dixon of Dock Green is one of the most influential British television shows. Without it, the police procedural on both small and big screens would be a very different proposition. But before any of that, it too had