Tag Archives: Curzon Artificial Eye

Graduation (Bacalaureat)

Despite some questionable actions, it’s hard not to feel sorry for  Adrian Titieni’s Dr Romeo Aldea in award winning director Cristian Mungiu’s film Graduation (or Bacalaureat as it is known in its native Romania); weighed down by middle age and with only his good reputation to comfort

Lost In France

The music industry is full of holy grail moments. A significant, chance meeting that launches a band that goes on to change the world, a landmark album, a legendary gig or the promise of what might have been.  It doesn’t matter what band, singer or

Through the Wall

“I have a hall. I have a dress. The apartment is almost ready. It’s a small task for God to find me a groom by the end of Hanukkah” So says Michal, the kooky heroine of writer/director Rama Burshtein’s Through the Wall (alternatively known as

Keyframe 61 – Alternate World Long-Legged Mac Daddy

This week we find out what happens when you don’t ban certain plot devices from a short story competition, and a “shrine” to anime and manga is being rebuilt. Our featured anime are Durarara!!x2 Shou, Fate/Stay Night: Unlimited Blade Works part 2 and Anomalisa (from

The Clan

Following his stint in the Spanish-language anthology film, 7 Days in Havana which was undertaken by several filmmakers and actors from golden boy, Benicio del Toro to Emir Kusturica. Pablo Trapero returns to the director’s chair with a kaboom in The Clan, Argentina’s entry for

The Sacrifice

Released just six months before his death from cancer, Andrei Tarkovsky’s The Sacrifice is commonly held to be an uncomfortably elegiac, melancholy note for the great director to bow out on, which considering the rest of his films were hardly Duck Soup is saying something.

Nostalgia

Curzon Artificial Eye releases the penultimate film from Andrei Tarkovsky’s body of work in Nostalgia and its something of an enigma. Post-Stalker, Tarkovsky planned to make a film called The First Day which concerned itself with atheism in the Soviet Union, long story short, he

Stalker

Solaris got the remake, Andrei Rublev got the Vatican’s thumbs-up, and Mirror famously caused Lars von Trier to declare Andrei Tarkovsky was God.  But the biggest cultural footprint of all the Russian director’s seven feature films undoubtedly belongs to Stalker.  His adaptation of Arkady and Boris

Solaris

Andrei Tarkovsky’s third film, following his chilling debut Ivan’s Childhood and the mammoth Andrei Rublev, Solaris is a film that is more about experience and environment than enjoyment or leisure. Clocking in at 2 hours and 40 minutes, this science-fiction voyage into the human soul

Andrei Rublev

Following on from Ivan’s Childhood, Curzon Artificial Eye continues their retrospective on Russian Grandmaster Andrei Tarkovsky with Andrei Rublev. The second feature from Russia’s most celebrated film export follows the titular fifteenth-century iconographer as he walks the lands – starting when he is young and