Tag Archives: Dracula

Blood from the Mummy’s Tomb

It’s nearly Christmas, so let us think of those less fortunate than us: specifically, the Mummy.  Even before this summer’s Tom Cruise-led flop, ol’ bandage face had a chequered screen history.  The 1932 Universal feature had Boris Karloff in front of the camera, Karl Freund

The Gorgon

The most famous monsters in Hammer Studios’ repertoire were essentially the same ones Universal had hit paydirt with in the 1930s: Dracula, Frankenstein’s Monster, the mummy.  But Hammer had plenty of other things to shock and disturb audiences with – zombies, Satanists, aliens, man-lizards and, at

Jinnah

Has any genre been as cursed by its own success as the biopic?  The very first feature-length film, Charles Tait’s The Story of the Kelly Gang, falls into the category, as do agreed-upon high culture classics like Carl Theodor Dreyer’s The Passion of Joan of

Stella Cadente

Anybody wondering whether Stella Cadente is a traditional royal costume drama will have their questions answered about twenty-six minutes in, when the King’s assistant goes out to the woods to have sex with a melon while an aria from Madame Butterfly plays. As confident in

Story of my Death

There’s an inherent risk to saying this on the internet these days, but here we go: sometimes spoilers aren’t a bad thing. Every single synopsis or review I’ve read of Albert Serra’s seventh feature film, Story of My Death, mentions a character who doesn’t turn

Blacula – The Complete Collection

Blaxploitation habitually made itself a wide open target for parody and mockery, take the newly released Blacula directed by William Crain, it sounds like a joke rather than something conceived from a creative mind. Even the trailer made at the time of release called Blacula,