Tag Archives: Film Review

The Bird with the Crystal Plumage

Dario Argento is synonymous with the Giallo (Heavily stylised Italian Murder/Slasher) whereby one of his latter day and inferior films carries the very same moniker, similarly, his directorial debut the Bird with the Crystal Plumage counts among the most acclaimed and beloved movies in the

Cinema Eclectica 115 – Pirates of the Carry On

Witness us! This week our Director’s Lottery came up with Peter Weir’s 1985 thriller “Witness”, with Harrison Ford and a surprise Viggo. There’s also a question about actors who have one good performance in them – and if your first thought was Adam Sandler then

Graduation (Bacalaureat)

Despite some questionable actions, it’s hard not to feel sorry for  Adrian Titieni’s Dr Romeo Aldea in award winning director Cristian Mungiu’s film Graduation (or Bacalaureat as it is known in its native Romania); weighed down by middle age and with only his good reputation to comfort

Cinema Eclectica 114 – Cops Vs Goatzilla

Ever had one of those mornings? Anne Hathaway does in our Film or the Week – “Colossal” – when she finds out last night’s drunken bender has somehow destroyed Seoul. There’s plenty of destruction in Off the Shelf with yakuza running amok in Kinji Fukasaku’s

Spotlight on a Murderer

Whether it’s Agatha Christie or the likes of Law & Order and NCIS commanding TV schedules today, the murder mystery is one of the dominant genres in narrative media. Literally, every conceivable police department has been imagined in every major city, then there are the

Mulholland Drive

“Nah, you’re not thinkin’. You’re too busy being a smart-alec to be thinkin’” – The Cowboy If you’ve never seen David Lynch’s 2001 Cannes Best Director winner Mulholland Drive, it’s probably worth stopping reading and buying Studio Canal’s new Blu-Ray restoration right now. That’s normally

Madame De…

If you know anything about the German director Max Ophüls, you probably know Stanley Kubrick’s famous quote to the effect that his camera could pass through walls. Watching the BFI’s new sumptuous restoration of 1953’s Madame de…, one of his final films, it’s easy to