Tag Archives: Film Review

Letter to Brezhnev

Call me a sentimental old northerner, but the opening to Letter to Brezhnev remains one of my favourite moments of celluloid. Whilst budgetary constraints mean that it may not be as epic as it clearly wants to be, it nevertheless understands that Liverpool is a

Drunken Master

After the demise of Kong Kong Legends, British fans of martial arts classics were left wanting if they wanted to advance their collection or discover new favourites. Terracotta and 88 films picked up some of the slack but never enough to fill the void left

Lost In France

The music industry is full of holy grail moments. A significant, chance meeting that launches a band that goes on to change the world, a landmark album, a legendary gig or the promise of what might have been.  It doesn’t matter what band, singer or

Cinema Eclectica 103 – Footloose by the Sea

There are an awful lot of people plying their trade in film land – some of whom are real, and not made up at all. This week we negotiate that minefield with film-noir classic “Mildred Pierce”, Cuban new-wavisms with “Memories of Underdevelopment”, and history picked

Keyframe 71 – The Proletariat Elbow

It’s a shorter show than normal this week, partly because it’s awards season. Normal service will resume shortly (I’ve always wanted to say that). Our featured anime is One Piece: Gold. Tune in to The Geek Show Podcast Network for all the latest news, discussions

Cinema Eclectica 102 – Batsploitation

This week we’ve shrunk to a threesome and decide to offset the cream of the BAFTAs crop with some 1970s exploitation. First it’s the turn of Roger Corman and Vincent Price with “Tower of London” before we transition into a hundred super-colourful costume changes with

Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore

Ellen Burstyn was riding high off the back of The Exorcist and looking for a prospective project to make with Warner Brothers when Robert Getchell’s script for what was to become Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore fell into her lap. It was the early 1970s