Tag Archives: Film

Bagdad Cafe

A couple from Rosenheim, Germany stop at a gas station in the middle of the Mojave Desert, California and argue. The dissatisfied wife, Jasmin, (Marianne Sägebrecht) leaves her husband. She checks in at the Bagdad Cafe and Motel run by stressed business owner and single

Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters

An extraordinary film even by the standards of Criterion’s UK catalogue, Paul Schrader’s Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters is your go-to film to counter accusations that biopics are inherently stuffy, stylistically conservative Oscar-bait. And it’s all thanks to Hank Williams. After surviving the excesses

The Party

There are Elephants in the room that are both literal and metaphorical in the Party, the latest release from Eureka. One appears in the final chaotic throes of the titular party and the other is represented by Peter Sellers in brownface adopting an Indian accent.

Dunkirk (1958)

As a child obsessed with war, I well remember watching Dunkirk, Leslie (father of Barry) Norman’s 1958 film that depicted the events of May-June 1940, when the besieged soldiers of the British Expeditionary Force were stranded on the coast of France, and the combined efforts

Classic Film Kid: Raiders of the Lost Ark

Hello, yet again, from the Classic Film Kid! After my step into TV last time, we’re getting into some classic films again, and today it’s none other than Harrison Ford’s action lead, Indiana Jones, in Raiders of the Lost Ark. In this, professor and archaeologist

Erik the Conqueror

In “Gli Imatori”, a visual essay featured in an uncharacteristically spartan selection of arrow video features, Michael Mackenzie comments on Italian cinema’s propensity to copy (escape from New York becomes 2019: After the Fall of New York, for example) as this latest Mario Bava title

The Love of a Woman

‘En dix ans, douze millions de beaux bébés pour la France.’ With those words Charles de Gaulle ushered in a new era of French ‘politique nataliste’ in 1945, a system of government incentives and social and religious pressures intended to address the country’s low birth

Lord of the Flies

Among those of us who value books as discrete physical objects – which is slightly more of us than is comfortable for Amazon’s share price – film tie-in editions are a wearying necessity, a crude imposition of a completely different style of art for crass

Your Name

If you’ve heard of Your Name, the latest film from director Makoto Shinkai and highest grossing anime film worldwide, you’ve almost certainly heard of it in glowing terms and heaped with praise. Recently I’ve frequently found myself on the opposite side to popular opinion, I’m