Tag Archives: John Carpenter

Cure

In 1999, Hideo Nakata’s gloomy horror masterwork, Ring, popularised a wave of horror films from Japan that took the world by storm under the banner of J-Horror. J-Horror, like any genre or movement, has its line-up of standards and tropes, with the harsh digital look

Strangled

Montage Pictures (a subsidiary label of Eureka) debuted with two unheard titles from the outer reaches of world cinema last year; Argyis Papadimitropoulis’s slow-burning drama, ‘Suntan’, and Attila Till’s wheelchair-bound hitman movie, ‘Kills on Wheels’. Following in a similar vein is Árpád Sopsits’s downbeat thriller,

The Witch Who Came from the Sea

Newly released as a stand-alone Blu-Ray by Arrow, The Witch Who Came From the Sea was previously part of Arrow’s American Horror Project Vol. 1 along with Malatesta’s Carnival of Blood and The Premonition.  It’s a much less comfortable fit within the horror genre than those

The Wall

Thankfully not a film about Trump’s intentions regarding the US/Mexico border, The Wall is, in fact, a tense, psychological war movie from director Doug Liman. The Wall is essentially a three-hander (though in truth the vast chunk of its running time sees it operate more

The Crazies (1973)

To celebrate the life of George A. Romero, Arrow Video have released a box set of three films called between Night and Dawn. It could just as easily be called ‘more than just night and dawn’ as Romero was largely overlooked outside of the Night

Phantasm

There’s a loathable and inescapable truth in discussing the legacy of the horror franchise. Those titles with a tangible look, whether it’s the pallid white mask of Halloween’s Michael Myers, the grotesque abominations of Hellraiser’s Cenobites or the red and black sweater/bladed glove combo of

Cinema Eclectica 93 – High Voltage: Carlos Danger

The weather was as bad as Carlos Danger this week so we apologise for the inconsistent audio. The Director’s Lottery returns for another innings, but before that we take a look at the hilarious political documentary “Weiner” and the early John Carpenter classic “Assault on

Assault on Precinct 13 (1976)

John Carpenter’s filmography is a curious animal, subject to both wild scrutiny and glorious celebration. What’s more, his work has been remade, twisted and contorted by both genre stalwarts and studio remit with wildly different results – from the heinous [the] Fog to the solidly

Christine

As culture becomes more fixated on nostalgia, we’re going to have to spend a lot of time reassessing what happened two or three decades ago.  At the moment that means the Eighties, with everything from Stranger Things to Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles drawing from The Me Decade.  Comparing

The Club

Whatever he did for his fourth film, Pablo Larraín must have known he needed to make a sharp turn.  His first three films form such a comprehensive trilogy on life under Pinochet’s dictatorship that anything more would have risked tilling over old ground.  His debut, Tony