Tag Archives: Kiyoshi Kurosawa

Cure

In 1999, Hideo Nakata’s gloomy horror masterwork, Ring, popularised a wave of horror films from Japan that took the world by storm under the banner of J-Horror. J-Horror, like any genre or movement, has its line-up of standards and tropes, with the harsh digital look

Cinema Eclectica Episode 94 – Opening a Can of Kevin Smith

We have our second ever photonegative show featuring lots of new releases from all over the world. The choice cuts are Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s “Creepy”, Botswanan drama “A United Kingdom”, Robert Zemeckis’ “Allied” and hysteria-laden Korean horror “The Wailing”. Staying with South Korea, Kim Jee-Woon is

Dark Water

In a newly recorded interview, director Hideo Nakata not only talks about his rise through the studio system and his break directing the original Ring, he also talks about Dramatic Horror. Such a notion is only given credibility by the art-house, independent and marginalized, even

LFF 2016: Creepy

Kiyoshi Kurosawa is no stranger to 2016, already his previous film, Journey to the Shore, saw release on Masters of Cinema and that charming albeit misunderstood film took a fascinating posture on saying goodbye to the dearly departed. His second film of the year debuted

Cinema Eclectica 68 – Carry On Punk Rocking

There’s a Carry On with all this Punk Rock. In Off The Shelf we look at Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s “Journey to the Shore”, the gothic horror “Whistle and I’ll Come to You”, the powerful Glenn Campbell documentary “I’ll Be Me” and the forgotten 1980’s horror “Malatesta’s

Journey to the Shore

Horror has many go to Monsters; one will have its turn in the limelight before passing it on to the next evolving a little along the way. The subtleties of titles like the Uninvited or the Haunting have subsided only to be replaced by the

Shady

Third Windows Films are a firm favourite here at The Geek Show, partly because they let us review all their releases, but mostly due to them releasing a healthy mix of classics and new titles from Asian cinema. They are the last and best men

The Woodsman & The Rain

The Japanese film industry is in a state of instability now, many of the old masters have passed on and the more fashionable names are proving to be inconsistent at best. There a few new names emerging in your Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Sion Sono or Yoshihiro