Tag Archives: Martin Scorsese

Stormy Monday

It would probably be impossible to make a genuinely anti-American film; as with rock and roll, the USA has contributed so much to the history of the art form that any political stance has to be tempered by the sheer cultural debt. Mike Figgis’s debut

Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore

Ellen Burstyn was riding high off the back of The Exorcist and looking for a prospective project to make with Warner Brothers when Robert Getchell’s script for what was to become Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore fell into her lap. It was the early 1970s

Who’s That Knocking At My Door

Who’s That Knocking At My Door, Martin Scorsese’s black and white debut feature film from 1968, originally started out life as his NYU graduation project some three years earlier. Aged just 23, armed with a miniscule budget and relying on numerous favours, Scorsese took to

The Clan

Following his stint in the Spanish-language anthology film, 7 Days in Havana which was undertaken by several filmmakers and actors from golden boy, Benicio del Toro to Emir Kusturica. Pablo Trapero returns to the director’s chair with a kaboom in The Clan, Argentina’s entry for

Cat People

After the debut film by their golden boy Orson Welles underperformed at the box office, RKO Studios decided to refocus their efforts on commercial genre work. They decided to create a new “horror unit” to make inexpensive frighteners and put Val Lewton, a former employee

Anticipated Movies: 2016

Yesterday we posted our 20 favourite films of the past year, although it may well be the geek show’s official list it is by no means definitive. Tune in to the next Cinema Eclectica for more on our review of 2015, our other podcasts will

Han Gong-Ju

The Korean New Wave was primarily defined by three directors, Kim Jee-Woon, Park Chan-Wook and Bong Joon-Ho, with the three of them being courted to foreign climes the international stature of this national wave of cinema has significantly atrophied. Korean cinema isn’t the cool new

The Promised Land

The latest addition to the Second Run Roster was voted ‘Best Film in the history of Polish cinema’ in monthly magazine FILM. Andrzej Wajda’s The Promised Land, based on the 1898 novel by Władysław Reymont, takes place at the peak of the industrial revolution and