Tag Archives: Musical

House (Hausu)

There’s a tiresome tendency among Westerners to squeal “wtf japan lol” every time a Japanese film exhibits a minor eccentricity, but sometimes you have to acknowledge a film is very strange.  That’s the case with 1977’s House, now released on Blu-Ray by Eureka Masters of Cinema.

Nerima Daikon Brothers (review)

Everyone has a dream. Something they wish they were doing instead of the menial task at hand. And the Nerima Daikon Brothers are no different as they dream of building a stage on their Daikon farm and singing to roaring crowds. Unfortunately, like most in

Moana – new princess, new culture, same old charm

Moana is the latest film from Walt Disney Animation Studios and tells the story of Moana (played be Auli’i Cravalho), the daughter of a Polynesian chief who travels across the ocean with the demigod Maui (played by Dwayne Johnson) to save the world from being

Carmen Jones

Your reviewer can sometimes be guilty of dancing around the less quantifiable aspects of enjoying a movie, so let’s talk about star presence. As soon as she appears on screen in Otto Preminger’s 1950 musical – reissued for the first time on Blu-Ray by the

Absolute Beginners

Alongside The Mission and Revolution, Absolute Beginners was accused of destroying the British film industry in the mid to late 1980’s. It was bad luck for Goldcrest, the studio behind Julian Temple’s lavish production, as they backed-up all three films, released them at nearly the

Expresso Bongo

Let us imagine the pitch: a hotshot young writer and a director whose career spans groundbreaking horror, gritty drama and sexploitation decide to make a musical. But not just any musical – this would be a musical powered by stage performances, rather than the familiar

Tokyo Tribe

Nobody has quite the same grasp on the enfant terrible director as Japan: the 1960s and 70s had Seijun Suzuki and Kinji Fukusaku; the modern-day has Takashi Miike and the ever unpredictable Sion Sono. Japanese cinema has never had to try hard to find a

Nashville (1975)

Catching up with reviews for the immense catalogue of releases we’ve accumulated is one of Masters of Cinema’s latest releases and a film singled out as one of Altman’s best works – Nashville. On the sheer scale of the venture, thinking of this release as

Phantom of the Paradise

Brian de Palma is of a class of genre directors who rose to prominence in the 1970s and 80s that have become known for a specific type of film (see also Michael Mann and Dario Argento). That specific film is a violent and twisty thriller;