Tag Archives: Orson Welles

The Lady from Shanghai

Orson Welles once claimed he only saw thrillers as a means to an end, that if it wasn’t for the unfortunate necessity of getting films funded he wouldn’t have made any. As if to demonstrate this, he would often tell a story about the genesis

Cinema Eclectica 103 – Footloose by the Sea

There are an awful lot of people plying their trade in film land – some of whom are real, and not made up at all. This week we negotiate that minefield with film-noir classic “Mildred Pierce”, Cuban new-wavisms with “Memories of Underdevelopment”, and history picked

My Twentieth Century

“We live in the flicker”, Joseph Conrad famously wrote, referring to the breathless speed of technological advancement in the crossover from nineteenth to twentieth century.  In addressing the same historical period, Ildikó Enyedi’s debut film My Twentieth Century – released on DVD and Blu-Ray by

Radio Days

If you want to see an impressive track record from any filmmaker, then Woody Allen shines as one of the most prolific directors of modern times. Since 1982 with A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy, Woody has directed a film each and every year. This is

Cinema Eclectica 85 – Time Skips and Road Trips

On this highly mobile episode we take a look at Jacques Tourneur’s “Cat People”, Paul Newman and Orson Welles in “The Long Hot Summer”, Stanley Kramer’s “The Secret of Santa Vittoria” and cult British Horror “Psychomania”. After that we hand over to our past selves

Cat People

After the debut film by their golden boy Orson Welles underperformed at the box office, RKO Studios decided to refocus their efforts on commercial genre work. They decided to create a new “horror unit” to make inexpensive frighteners and put Val Lewton, a former employee

Richard III

Ever since the Golden Age of Hollywood, Shakespeare adaptations have struggled to win a box-office take to match their prestige.  The shining exception to the rule came during the 1990s, a period in which the Bard was so bankable that by the end of the decade Julie

Akira Kurosawa’s Ran

Shakespeare’s stories, character and language might be what reel us in, but it’s the mysteries that can engender an obsession. From Sigmund Freud, who famously pored over a psychiatric diagnosis of Prince Hamlet, to John Sutherland and Cedric Watts, who published an entire book (Henry