Tag Archives: review

Game of Thrones – A Telltale Series

The Game of Thrones TV adaptation, the pop culture behemoth that it is, seems an obvious match for Telltale’s episodic, story-driven style. Telltale’s game features an original story that ties in with the series, starting at the Red Wedding, starring their own Stark loyalists, House

Super Bomberman R

Press A to plant bombs. Don’t let said bombs blow you up. It’s rare to see a game that is still as basic as this on a modern day console, however, Super Bomberman R is one that takes pride in giving us the classic Bomberman

Alice

In his book Crackpot, John Waters devotes a chapter to his guilty pleasure movies – the joke being that the trash cinema most people would describe as a guilty pleasure is exactly what you’d expect Waters to unashamedly love.  Instead, the chapter is devoted to achingly

A Silent Voice

I’ll be honest, I don’t like small kids very much. I mention this because I get the feeling that A Silent Voice might be agreeing with me. Let’s start with the short version. In elementary school our protagonist, Shoya Ishida, ruthlessly bullied a deaf girl

Fire Emblem Heroes

Starting from ‘Fire Emblem’ (Fire Emblem 7) being released back in late 2003, I’ve been a huge fan of the series, it felt deeper than Final Fantasy Tactics or Disgaea despite the slightly simpler interface and the ability to have deeper levels of characters via

Raising Cain

In Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow’s disarmingly forthright documentary, De Palma, its subject talks about the highs and lows of his career. In that one man and his camera documentary, there is one sentence that perfectly encapsulates how modest a man Brian De Palma is.

The Glass Shield

African-American cinema’s relationship to the American mainstream is kind of like Halley’s comet; it’s always there, it’s just not always visible.  Charles Burnett’s career has lasted long enough to intersect with two major movements in black cinema; he may yet connect with the ongoing one.  After

Review: Drifters

Crossovers are nothing new, nor is the concept of taking characters out of their own time zones to try and have some epic war (to this day I still shudder at the thought of ‘The Five Doctors) and yet Drifters is a thing, bringing together

The Cabinet of Dr Caligari

The film with the wonky sets?  Yes, the film with the wonky sets – but Robert Wiene’s silent horror landmark has so much more to offer, and that’s never been as apparent as it will be when you watch Eureka Masters of Cinema’s new loaded-up