Tag Archives: Russia

The Colour of Pomegranates

It’s a very large box for a very short film. Maybe you find that challenging, or intimidating, or mind-numbing, or somewhere between all three. If so, I’m not exactly sweetening the pot if I tell you that the film is a series of oblique, poetic

The Geek Show - S15E13 - Flamethrower Cooking With Elon Musk

S15E13 – Flamethrower Cooking With Elon Musk

It’s time to join Rob and Andy for more news-based shenanigans from the realms of science and technology, and we’re kicking things of this week with some recycling … … on the Moon After that it’s all systems go with potential holodeck technology, stupidity causing


Curzon Artificial Eye releases the penultimate film from Andrei Tarkovsky’s body of work in Nostalgia and its something of an enigma. Post-Stalker, Tarkovsky planned to make a film called The First Day which concerned itself with atheism in the Soviet Union, long story short, he


Andrei Tarkovsky’s third film, following his chilling debut Ivan’s Childhood and the mammoth Andrei Rublev, Solaris is a film that is more about experience and environment than enjoyment or leisure. Clocking in at 2 hours and 40 minutes, this science-fiction voyage into the human soul

Andrei Rublev

Following on from Ivan’s Childhood, Curzon Artificial Eye continues their retrospective on Russian Grandmaster Andrei Tarkovsky with Andrei Rublev. The second feature from Russia’s most celebrated film export follows the titular fifteenth-century iconographer as he walks the lands – starting when he is young and

Ivan’s Childhood

Film history tends to invite less counterfactual speculation than military or political history, but here’s one for you: what if Ivan’s Childhood, now reissued by Curzon Artificial Eye, had never been made? Because that really did come close to happening. During production, source author Vladimir

Hard to be a God

The world feels like a brutal, unsentimental place after watching Aleksei German’s final film, not least when I had the following realisation: Hard to be a God’s ceaseless, grotesque phantasmagoria of cruelty makes German the only director who could possibly adapt Cormac McCarthy’s classic novel