Tag Archives: Second Run DVD

The Miraculous Virgin

Štefan Uher’s The Miraculous Virgin, released on Blu-Ray for the first time anywhere in the world by Second Run Films, is one of those 1960s Czechoslovak films that’s so freeform in its plotting, so rapturously visual, that it’s hard to imagine it having a script,

Silence and Cry

First-time viewers of Miklós Jancsó’s 1968 film Silence and Cry, reissued on Blu-Ray and DVD by Second Run, will be greeted by something they might not expect from the veteran Hungarian director – a montage. Don’t worry, it doesn’t last. The rest of the film

Cinema Eclectica’s Best Home Video of 2016

As well as reviewing the latest releases, our in-house movie podcast, Cinema Eclectica, also acts as your guide to the increasingly labyrinthine home video market. The idea of collecting films isn’t quite the mainstream thing it once was, the rise of streaming and VOD services

The Shop on the High Street

Viewers for whom the former Czechoslovakia is, in the notorious words of Neville Chamberlain, “a faraway country of which we know little”, might be puzzled by one repeated image in Ján Kádar and Elmar Klos’s 1965 Oscar-winner The Shop on the High Street.  It’s a huge

Joshua Oppenheimer: Early Work

For most filmgoers, Joshua Oppenheimer emerged fully-formed out of nowhere with his landmark 2012 documentary The Act of Killing. A horrifyingly intimate portrait of elderly death squad leaders in Indonesia, it fused fearless journalism with surreal, fantastical black comedy – a mix which earned the

Pick of the Geek – The Cremator

A Slovak Jew working in Czech Prague, Juraj Herz was an outsider even among the glorious misfits who populated the cinema scene of Communist-era Czechoslovakia. Nothing he ever did was predictable, so when he decided to address his history as an inmate of Ravensbrück concentration

Mysterious Object at Noon

The first film by Apichatpong Weerasethakul begins with a shot that approximates the feeling of tuning an analogue radio; mysterious, haunting, archaic and likely to land you somewhere you weren’t expecting. It’s a black-and-white tracking shot through the front window of a moving vehicle, with

All My Good Countrymen

A rural, bawdy, political epic with magical realist fringes, full of drinking, singing and close-ups on weathered peasant faces, Vojtěch Jasný’s 1968 film All My Good Countrymen is exactly the sort of thing some people think of when you talk about classic European cinema. Following