Tag Archives: Silent Cinema

Jauja

Jauja, in Peru, was once thought to be a Mecca of milk and honey. Thought unreachable by man, this fact was attested to by the number of people who went missing while searching for it  – according to the opening expository text dump. Both the geographic and mythical

The Day the Earth Caught Fire

Given the recent unseasonably warm spell and the continuing discourse on global Warming, Val Guest’s 1961 sci-fi drama The Day the Earth caught fire – fresh from the BFI archive – takes on an eerily prescient quality. First Guest and Wolf Mankowitz’s London suffers an

Madame Dubarry (1919)

Ernst Lubitsch isn’t remembered for the silent work which Eureka’s Masters of Cinema is concerning themselves with at present, instead his name carries traction as a result of his famous light dramatic comedies of the 1930’s and 40s (To be or not to be, Trouble

Wings (1927)

Reviewing silent cinema is a difficult task, evaluating something so antiquated with the sensibilities of the modern era requires the creativity to look past the most hackneyed of conventions with the freshness they were first viewed with. Failing that, legacy is always a way into