Tag Archives: Western

Breakheart Pass

A train is bound for Fort Humboldt, a snowcapped US Army frontier outpost where an outbreak of fatal diphtheria has decimated the regiment leaving the fort vulnerable and open to attack. On board the train is a detachment of soldiers set to relieve the sick

Silence and Cry

First-time viewers of Miklós Jancsó’s 1968 film Silence and Cry, reissued on Blu-Ray and DVD by Second Run, will be greeted by something they might not expect from the veteran Hungarian director – a montage. Don’t worry, it doesn’t last. The rest of the film

Two Rode Together

The celebrated director John Ford once said of his overlooked 1961 film, Two Rode Together as “the worst piece of crap I’ve made in twenty years”. It’s understandable why he would say something like this as production for Two Rode Together was far from an

The Emigrants and The New Land

In its native America, the Criterion Collection earned its reputation for desirable, extras-packed editions of arthouse classics over whole decades, disc by disc. When it expanded to Region 2 in April this year, it wasn’t an unknown quantity – cinephiles with region-free players had been

The Ox-Bow Incident

The introduction is one of the most underrated aspects of home video, one as good as that which Peter Stanfield provides on Arrow’s release of William A. Wellman’s The Ox-Bow Incident transforms a film – providing a context, drawing attention to details and being about

Black Horse Canyon

Black Horse Canyon, a 50s Western based on Lee Savage’s novel, The Wild Horse sets up a clichéd love triangle and throws in the odd gun-run and pistol shoot out for good measure. A Rancher (Del Rockwell) and his adopted son (Race Gentry) are trying

Back to God’s Country

A Technicolor frontier adventure set in the wilds of the Arctic, Back to God’s Country exists at the intersection of three of the most comfortingly dad-movie genres; the pre-revisionist Western, the wilderness survival story and the Jack London-patented faithful dog story.  Source author James Oliver

Day of the Outlaw

Westerns and Martial Arts cinema have a remarkable amount in common, for one they remake each other with a significant consistency; but for the purposes of this review their kinship is important due to them being genre’s that are hard to penetrate for the uninitiated.

Jauja

Jauja, in Peru, was once thought to be a Mecca of milk and honey. Thought unreachable by man, this fact was attested to by the number of people who went missing while searching for it  – according to the opening expository text dump. Both the geographic and mythical