Tag Archives: Fritz Lang

Strangled

Montage Pictures (a subsidiary label of Eureka) debuted with two unheard titles from the outer reaches of world cinema last year; Argyis Papadimitropoulis’s slow-burning drama, ‘Suntan’, and Attila Till’s wheelchair-bound hitman movie, ‘Kills on Wheels’. Following in a similar vein is Árpád Sopsits’s downbeat thriller,

The Cremator

Opening on extreme close-ups of a leopard trapped within a cage, Juraj Herz’s ‘The Cremator’ is the cinematic equivalent of a black hole, it sucks the audience into the warped imagination of Karl Kopfrkingl (Rudolf Hrušínský), who is out on a day trip with his

The General

In 2016, Eureka re-issued their wonderful collection of Buster Keaton shorts and in that not only can you find the genesis of big-screen comedy, you can also find the work of a man experimenting with effects and stunt work decades ahead of its time. Two

Destiny (DER MÜDE TOD)

In what is already unarguably an eclectic and impressive body of work, Fritz Lang’s 1921 silent epic Destiny (or Der müde Tod as it is known in its native tongue) ranks as one of the legendary filmmaker’s stranger productions. Written by his wife, Thea von Harbou,

Shadows and Fog

One year following his overlooked 1990 film, Alice, Woody Allen followed that up with his tribute film towards the German expressionist film movement, Shadows and Fog. As the title suggests, Allen and cinematographer, Carlo Di Palma, soak the film in a misty and darkened b/w

Keyframe 70 – Kirito’s Computer Haka

This week we’ve got Antarctic Doraemon, Gintama Valentine’s statues, and an odd choice for a cybersecurity officer. Our featured anime are Metropolis and Psycho Pass part 1. Tune in to The Geek Show Podcast Network for all the latest news, discussions and reviews, and follow

Varieté

If you type in the term “Unchained camera” into the Wikipedia search bar, you’ll come across a very brief article where it hints that F. W. Murnau, one of the finest directors to come out of the German expressionist film movement, was the creator of

The Early Murnau Boxset: Tartuffe

In Jean-Pierre Melville’s debut film The Silence of the Sea, Howard Vernon’s tragically naive Nazi lieutenant tries to curry favour with the French family he’s staying with by praising their culture.  He says his Fatherland has but one emblematic literary genius, Goethe, but France is

Cinema Eclectica 21 – Hey, Hey – Man Tears!

It’s a slow news week because Cannes has rolled around again, but we give it the old college try anyway. In “Off the Shelf” we discuss Fritz Lang’s silent classic Frau Im Mond before discovering the strange wonders of  Second Run’s Polish Cinema Collection Volume