Tag Archives: Masters of Cinema

Cure

In 1999, Hideo Nakata’s gloomy horror masterwork, Ring, popularised a wave of horror films from Japan that took the world by storm under the banner of J-Horror. J-Horror, like any genre or movement, has its line-up of standards and tropes, with the harsh digital look

The Old Dark House

During a particularly treacherous thunderstorm in rural Wales, a series of travellers are forced to seek refuge in an eerie and isolated house. Their hosts are an elderly eccentric pair of siblings and their mute brute of a butler. As the night unfolds, the stranded

Classic Film Kid – Silent Running

Well, we’ve got an interesting one on our hands… Hello guys, and welcome to a review of another classic film! This time, we are looking at one of the first environmental films, as we look at the post-apocalyptic sci-fi drama, Silent Running. This film follows

Carl Th. Dreyer’s Michael

When’s a good time to reissue a film? Had Eureka Masters of Cinema put out this Blu-Ray reissue of Carl Theodor Dreyer’s Michael last year, it might have been a valuable contribution to the fiftieth anniversary of the decriminalisation of homosexuality in Britain. As it

House (Hausu)

There’s a tiresome tendency among Westerners to squeal “wtf japan lol” every time a Japanese film exhibits a minor eccentricity, but sometimes you have to acknowledge a film is very strange.  That’s the case with 1977’s House, now released on Blu-Ray by Eureka Masters of Cinema.

Sherlock Jr

The shortest of Buster Keaton’s features, the 45-minute Sherlock Jr. is only five minutes longer than the Oscars’ stated limit for short films (not that they existed back then). It had been conceived and shot as a six-reel feature, but Keaton deleted two of those

The Saga of Anatahan

In a recent self-titled documentary Brian De Palma stated that film-makers produce their best works between the age of 30 and 50, between that and the industry forever pursuing new and interesting voices, it makes ‘the final movie’ an incredibly interesting topic of discussion. Legendary

Westfront 1918 & Kameradschaft

During the late 1920’s to the early 1930’s, G. W. Pabst’s directorial career was on fire. In 1929, he crafted three films. The two Louise Brooks movies that made him synonymous with silent film, ‘Pandora’s Box’ and ‘Diary of a Lost Girl’, and the mountaineering