All posts by Graham Williamson

Blood from the Mummy’s Tomb

It’s nearly Christmas, so let us think of those less fortunate than us: specifically, the Mummy.  Even before this summer’s Tom Cruise-led flop, ol’ bandage face had a chequered screen history.  The 1932 Universal feature had Boris Karloff in front of the camera, Karl Freund

The Witch Who Came from the Sea

Newly released as a stand-alone Blu-Ray by Arrow, The Witch Who Came From the Sea was previously part of Arrow’s American Horror Project Vol. 1 along with Malatesta’s Carnival of Blood and The Premonition.  It’s a much less comfortable fit within the horror genre than those

Sherlock Jr

The shortest of Buster Keaton’s features, the 45-minute Sherlock Jr. is only five minutes longer than the Oscars’ stated limit for short films (not that they existed back then). It had been conceived and shot as a six-reel feature, but Keaton deleted two of those

Voice of the Moon

By an odd coincidence, 1990 saw the release of two films called Voice of the Moon, one of which saw the beginning of a directorial career, the other saw the end of it. The first was a short documentary by Richard Stanley about his travels

J.D.’s Revenge

One of the many rare and cherishable things about Jordan Peele’s Get Out was that it was a horror movie with an African-American lead that nevertheless wasn’t pitched or marketed as the black version of any pre-existing horror film. After Night of the Living Dead,

The Gorgon

The most famous monsters in Hammer Studios’ repertoire were essentially the same ones Universal had hit paydirt with in the 1930s: Dracula, Frankenstein’s Monster, the mummy.  But Hammer had plenty of other things to shock and disturb audiences with – zombies, Satanists, aliens, man-lizards and, at

The Haunting

The transformation of the haunted-house subgenre began in Edgar Allen Poe’s The Fall of the House of Usher, where the house, rather than just the ghosts within it, demonstrated paranormal abilities.  In his essay ‘Supernatural Horror’ H.P. Lovecraft argued that the point of Poe’s story was