All posts by Graham Williamson

Voice of the Moon

By an odd coincidence, 1990 saw the release of two films called Voice of the Moon, one of which saw the beginning of a directorial career, the other saw the end of it. The first was a short documentary by Richard Stanley about his travels

J.D.’s Revenge

One of the many rare and cherishable things about Jordan Peele’s Get Out was that it was a horror movie with an African-American lead that nevertheless wasn’t pitched or marketed as the black version of any pre-existing horror film. After Night of the Living Dead,

The Gorgon

The most famous monsters in Hammer Studios’ repertoire were essentially the same ones Universal had hit paydirt with in the 1930s: Dracula, Frankenstein’s Monster, the mummy.  But Hammer had plenty of other things to shock and disturb audiences with – zombies, Satanists, aliens, man-lizards and, at

The Haunting

The transformation of the haunted-house subgenre began in Edgar Allen Poe’s The Fall of the House of Usher, where the house, rather than just the ghosts within it, demonstrated paranormal abilities.  In his essay ‘Supernatural Horror’ H.P. Lovecraft argued that the point of Poe’s story was

The Vikings

It’s strange, on the face of it, that there aren’t more movies about Vikings.  Television has exploited this gap in the market with shows like – well, like Vikings, obviously – but there’s still a puzzling absence of Norsemen on the big screen.  Puzzling because

Vampir Cuadecuc

Some time in the early 2000s, a Peruvian government spokesman was forced to testily deny online rumours that some of the country’s cabinet were vampires. “A government cannot go around sucking the blood of its people”, the spokesman claimed, inviting the obvious rejoinder; which government

Certain Women

It’s always an interesting statement of values when a prestige home video label decides to release a recent film. Everyone agrees on Kurosawa, Lang and Welles, but which modern director would you put in their company? In America, the Criterion Collection has got behind Wes

Song to Song

Released on DVD and download by StudioCanal, the history of Terrence Malick’s Song to Song goes back to the summer of 2011, when attendees at Austin, Texas’s famous South by Southwest music festival saw the director filming Ryan Gosling and Rooney Mara in the crowds.