Tag Archives: criterion collection

Classic Film Kid: 12 Angry Men

SPOILER WARNING Hi once again people, it’s the Classic Film Kid here with another film review. Today we are looking at one of the true classics, and that is Sidney Lumet’s 12 Angry Men. This film stars Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb, Ed Begley, and

Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters

An extraordinary film even by the standards of Criterion’s UK catalogue, Paul Schrader’s Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters is your go-to film to counter accusations that biopics are inherently stuffy, stylistically conservative Oscar-bait. And it’s all thanks to Hank Williams. After surviving the excesses

Midnight Cowboy

Hey! I’m walking here! I’m walking here!” And thus one of the most iconic moments of improvisational acting was born. 1969’s ‘Midnight Cowboy’ is home to this scene where Dustin Hoffman nearly gets run over by a cab who cuts a red light. However, outside

Metropolitan

It’s always a risk for a film to give you too many pointers about how to read it; most people like to work that out for themselves. But I was very charmed by a moment about halfway into Whit Stillman’s 1990 debut Metropolitan – reissued

Le Corbeau

A moment on the pen; a lifetime on the soul. Set in a small French village, Le Corbeau is the dark tale of a number of residents who find themselves the target of poison pen letters that condemn their perceived immoral behaviour. The primary target

Sword of Doom

The title of any given movie is supremely important, as many adage’s state first impressions matter and for any film that title is where we make that impression. Looking at the UK catalog of Criterion, we can separate a movie title into two camps –

Certain Women

It’s always an interesting statement of values when a prestige home video label decides to release a recent film. Everyone agrees on Kurosawa, Lang and Welles, but which modern director would you put in their company? In America, the Criterion Collection has got behind Wes

12 Angry Men

Does 12 Angry Men really need an introduction? The short answer would be no, but Sidney Lumet’s first feature has gone down in history as not only one of the greatest directorial debuts of all-time but also as one of the most important one location

Lone Wolf and Cub

Hitherto with their UK run, the criterion collection hasn’t released many of their more challenging titles instead opting for classics and cult titles whether that comes from screwball comedies or classic noir. That broader avenue sees Criterion occupy the same arena as Eureka’s Masters of

His Girl Friday

As Howard Hawk’s His Girl Friday opens, we are graced with a silent film style inter-title that announces that the following takes place in a world where Journalists have become an unscrupulous kind who care little of the people around them. What now reads as